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A new view of Earth and Moon from Mars - powerful telescope finds a reddish disc

In a new image that has come from Mars, Earth does not look like the Blue planet we are familiar with.   Shot from a distance of 205 million kilometers, it looks reddish in this image, released by Nasa.   The reflective side of Moon, which keeps faithful company to Earth, is also captured.    The image, taken by the powerful HiRISE  telescope on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on November 20 last year, gives a new perspective of the Earth and Moon from Mars.

In a new image that has come from Mars, Earth does not look like the Blue planet we are familiar with. 

Shot from a distance of 205 million kilometers, it looks reddish in this image, released by Nasa

The reflective side of Moon, which keeps faithful company to Earth, is also captured.  

The image, taken by the powerful HiRISE  telescope on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on November 20 last year, gives a new perspective of the Earth and Moon from Mars. 

The powerful image shows continent-size detail of Earth and the relative size of the moon. It shows the correct positions and sizes of the two bodies relative to each other. 

But Earth and moon look much closer than they actually are because of the Moon's orbital position at the time: 

So, why does Earth look reddish. It is blamed on Australia, which appears near the middle of the face of Earth, thanks to the angle of the  shot. 

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