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World's happiest man, Tibetan Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard, shares his secrets to be happy

A 69 year old Tibetan Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard hailing from France is officially the happiest man on earth.  Researchers at University of Wisconsin has studied brain signals for 12 years and the propensity for positivity and lightness that they found in Ricard's brain is unprecedented in medical history.  Richard Davidson, the neuroscientist at the head of the study, confirmed that Ricard's brain had an 'abnormal capacity for happiness', especially when he is meditating.

Staff Correspondent, NewsCrunch

A 69 year old Tibetan Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard hailing from France is officially the happiest man on earth.

Researchers at University of Wisconsin has studied brain signals for 12 years and the propensity for positivity and lightness that they found in Ricard's brain is unprecedented in medical history.

Richard Davidson, the neuroscientist at the head of the study, confirmed that Ricard's brain had an 'abnormal capacity for happiness', especially when he is meditating.

Ricard himself considers the 'happiest man on earth' title a media gimmick, but he conceded that he is indeed happy and content most of the time, reports The Independent.

So how does he do it?

The first tip that the sexagenarian has to offer is to take the focus away from 'me' all the time. Ricard explains that it is not only a moral high sounding advice. Thinking about how to better your position in the world all the time can be an utterly exhausting experience, which eats away at happiness. Instead, a moderately benevolent attitude within the limits of reason can not only reduce the insane stress levels in modern life, but attract friends as well.

Like the body, the mind can be also trained. While we train our body for physical endeavours like marathons, we mostly expect the mind to just take care of itself. Ricard begs to differ. He opines that the key ingredients of happiness are emotional balance, benevolence, attention and resilience - all skills that can be learnt through conscious training.

Last but not the least, the monk swears by the power of meditation. He urges people to spend at least fifteen consecutive minutes a day focussing on happy thoughts, without letting the mind wander to the next problem. 

Scientists tend to agree with him - 20 minutes of meditation a day has been shown to keep people much happier in general.

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